Tagged: ludonarrative dissonance

The Cut Scene Crutch 7

The Cut Scene Crutch

There isn’t a whole lot to talk about when it comes to posting slides and such from a five minute microtalk. This was, however, my first ever attempt at making some sort of presentation/talk in the game industry, so I want to post anyway. I called the talk “The Cut Scene Crutch” and, in it, I try to fit as much into the five minute time to form a coherent argument against the love of cut scenes as a means of storytelling in what is, first and foremost, an interactive medium. The associated text, which I primarily improvised when I...

Justifying the Means 16

Justifying the Means

[This post contains spoilers as to the entirety of Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2’s plot. I loved Modern Warfare 2 and will write about the brilliant core gameplay, mechanics, and level design in a later piece, but this is not that piece.] “Two men took down an entire base. I ask much more from you now.” General Shepard says as Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 loads the upcoming mission. Shepard goes on to tell the player about the danger of a Russian named Makarov who has “no rules. [And] No Boundaries.” Shepard says “You don’t want to know...

Game Design Logophilia 5

Game Design Logophilia

The IGDA Game Design SIG Mailing List recently had a mini-debate where someone off-handedly proposed the formation of a committee to focus on the establishment of a vocabulary for words key to the practice and discussion of game design. This is a topic that has been approached a few times before and it often seems that those for it are outnumbered by people who have an irrational hatred of the concept of a group of professionals defining terms that describe the field they work in. Instead, designers continue to latch on to terms from other professions to describe the work...

Ludonarrative Dissonance in Grand Theft Auto 2

Ludonarrative Dissonance in Grand Theft Auto

In many ways, Grand Theft Auto IV: The Lost and the Damned is a much better game than Grand Theft Auto IV proper. The original game centered on an eastern European immigrant finding his start in faux-New York City, along with his well-intentioned cousin and a sundry cast of ethnically diverse characters. Taken at face value, it’s a great narrative concept, especially for a video game, and made GTA IV an epic experience. But Grand Theft Auto IV tried to continually up the ante every few missions, resulting in an uninteresting and nonsensical mafioso finale. Grand Theft Auto IV: The...